A Faux stone floor

 How I used drywall compound to make a stone floor.
By the way, sometimes it's called drywall compound, other times stucco, or some refer to it as wall plaster.


Here's a picture that gives a better view of the floor of Tall Chimneys kitchen. I spread the drywall compound and let it dry a few minutes so it wasn't gloppy. I used a pencil to lightly trace out the shapes of the stones. If you press down on the pencil too much you make ridges, not enough and your stones tend to become indistinct. It takes a few practice trys. I made a couple of errors and just resmeared it up and started over. When your stones are drawn let the floor dry thoroughly overnight or at least a few hours. I next sanded the floor where I had any unwanted bumps and ridges. After that I started smoothing it with a damp rag. A damp rag is the same as sandpaper to unpainted drywall compound. I didn't want the stones perfectly smooth, but I didn't want them lumpy, either. I just kept working with the rag til I got the look I wanted. The nice thing is, if you feel you have totally botched the whole thing, or even just one section of it, you can reapply compound and start over or fix a section. I know, I goofed a couple of times and had to do a fix.

When you're happy with your stones you can paint them. I like to use color washes when I paint stones. I'll cover the stones in a base color, then start applying washes. You can wait for the base to dry or you can apply the washes right over it while its damp. The look can differ a bit one way or the other, you have to try and see what you prefer. To make the washes I select the other colors I want to show up in my stones. I don't recall the exact blend. Most likely it was a mix of ochre, off white, a beigey color, a brown...Color washes are easy to use. They're wet and just flow right onto the surface when you touch your brush to it. If you don't care for the color you can go over it with another wash and change it, or you can intensify it. I did a bit of color washing over my base color in a general way for the first step, giving the whole floor a sort of subtlely mottled appearance. I then began to pay attention to the individual stones. I'd do a stone here and there in a browner wash, then others with an off white wash til I was satisfied. The whole secret to successful painting techniques is to relax, let your wrists loosen up and just fool around with it til it begins to get comfortable and it seems to just naturally flow. I've made many stupid painting mistakes when I was tense and worried how it was going to turn out. It's funny, after years of painting I'm still pleased and surprised when things turn out just right.

9 comments:

  1. Beautiful! Looks so real! You've done a wonderful job here!

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  2. La felicito, le ha quedado precioso. Muy real.

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  3. Beautiful! Thank you for the tutorial!

    Jody
    Mini Leaps and Bounds

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  4. A really stunning effect -- thank you so much!

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  5. You are so creative. I love the effect and have used it in my little house. Thanks for the imspiration and the knowhow. Jo

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  6. Looks stunning, definetely not an easy task!

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  7. did you have a tut on how to use egg cartona as stone on a house??

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  8. Although I've used egg cartons to make stone for the Gnome's cottage well, I didn't do much of a tute.---
    Here's a nice one, though, by Carol Jones. http://www.miniland.ca/EggClass1.html

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